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Headlined and produced by Ebizo Ichikawa XI, the current holder of the most famous and prestigious hereditary name in the Kabuki world, JAPAN THEATER brings together two world-renowned theatrical art forms that are individually recognized as part of UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage--Kabuki and Noh. This is the international debut of both these arts on the same stage together.



Together with a troupe of 50 members consisting of world class Kabuki and Noh artists and musicians who are recognized as "living treasures of Japan", Japan Theater will be presenting the performance of Noh Shakkyo(Stone Bridge) and Kabuki Dance Renjishi (Lion Dance).

Renjishi is one of the most recognized acts in Kabuki and its story is also based on Shakkyo (Stone Bridge), which is also a recognized act in Noh. Through this performance, Ebizo Ichikawa's aim is to revive the interest in the traditional art by making it easier for the audience to appreciate and understand both art forms through non-verbal, dance only performances.

Event Date
November 14 - November 16 | 2014
            Friday, Nov 14 - 7:30pm
            Saturday, Nov 15 - 3:00pm & 7:30pm
            Sunday, Nov 16 - 3:00pm

Price of Admission:
A Reserve B Reserve C Reserve D Reserve
$185 $145 $115 $89
(excludes booking fee)


 

Two acts, one classic tale...
Japan Theater will be presenting the performance of Noh Shakkyo (Stone Bridge) and Kabuki Dance Renjishi (Lion Dance).

Legend has it that during the Tang Dynasty in China, there was a spiritual place at the bottom of Mount Seiryouzan, at which there was a stone bridge (Shakkyo). On the other side of the shore there was a sanctuary where Buddist saint Monju lived and he created a Holy Lion that is often seen dancing among blossoming Botan (peony) flowers.

Noh's Stone Bridge (Shakkyo):
In Noh, there is an act based on this legacy called "Stone Bridge". The highlight of this piece is the extraordinary gorgeousness of the dance. It will fill the audience with brightness and briskness. Since even novices to the Noh art can straightforwardly enjoy this piece, it was performed to entertain distinguished guests from overseas.

Kabuki's Lion Dance (Renjishi):
Kabuki Buyou (Renjishi) is based on Noh (Shakkyo). The theme that runs through these two pieces is that of a father shishi (a mythological lion-like animal) using hardship to test his child and allowing his son to learn to overcome the challenges by himself. The flowing action of the shishi's dance and hair movement is the magnificent highlight of this performance.

Both of these acts are grand, beautiful and demanding a high level of technique from the actors. Audiences will find this collaboration between the Lion dance of Kabuki and the brave and glamorous Noh as enjoyable as it is enchanting.

Show Program:
Opening – Rakugo (Mr. Bungiku Kokontei) 落語
Part l – Noh (Shakkyo) 能 「石橋」
Part ll – Kabuki Buyou Renjishi 歌舞伎舞踊 「連獅子」



 

The Sands Theatre is located at The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands and strategically placed across the mall's row of celebrity chef restaurants. With a seating capacity of 1,680 guests on two levels, The Sands Theatre features a spectacular box office and grand foyer, instantly transporting all our guests to a world of glitz and glamour.

The Sands Theatre boasts magnificent interior design with high ceilings, extravagant layout and plush furnishing aimed at creating a night of elegance. Set to dazzle all its guests, the theater has been carefully designed for exciting performances. With its traditional proscenium style venues, equipped with large orchestra pits, seat wagons and trap rooms, the theater has the latest technology to allow a multitude of stage configurations and efficient, seamless set-changes for all theater performances.





 


Venue:
Mastercard Theatres at the Marina Bay Sands
        10 Bayfront Ave, Singapore 018956

Event Date
November 14 - November 16 | 2014
            Friday, Nov 14 - 7:30pm
            Saturday, Nov 15 - 3:00pm & 7:30pm
            Sunday, Nov 16 - 3:00pm

Official Card:


 

Price of Admission:
A Reserve B Reserve C Reserve D Reserve
$185 $145 $115 $89
(excludes booking fee)






 

Kabuki, traditional Japanese popular drama with singing and dancing performed in a highly stylized manner. A rich blend of music, dance, mime, and spectacular staging and costuming, it has been a major theatrical form in Japan for almost four centuries. The term kabuki originally suggested the unorthodox and shocking character of this art form. In modern Japanese, the word is written with three characters: ka, signifying "song"; bu, "dance"; and ki, "skill".

Kabuki/s highly lyrical plays are regarded, with notable exceptions, less as literature than as vehicles for actors to demonstrate their enormous range of skills in visual and vocal performance. These actors have carried the traditions of Kabuki from one generation to the next with only slight alterations. Many of them trace their ancestry and performing styles to the earliest Kabuki actors and add a "generation number" after their names to indicate their place in the long line of actors.

Kabuki Theatre as an art form has been awarded UNESCO/s Intangible Cultural Heritage status.





 

Noh theatre, also spelled No, is a traditional Japanese theatrical form and one of the oldest extant theatrical forms in the world. Its name derived from no, meaning "talent" or "skill" and is unlike Western narrative drama. Rather than being actors or "representers" in the Western sense, Noh performers are simply storytellers who use their visual appearances and their movements to suggest the essence of their tale rather than to enact it. Little "happens" in a Noh drama, and the total effect is less that of a present action than of a simile or metaphor made visual. The educated spectators know the story's plot very well, so that what they appreciate are the symbols and subtle allusions to Japanese cultural history contained in the words and movements.

Noh developed from ancient forms of dance drama and from various types of festival drama at shrines and temples that had emerged by the 12th or 13th century. Noh became a distinctive form in the 14th century and was continually refined up to the years of the Tokugawa period (1603--1867). It became a ceremonial drama performed on auspicious occasions by professional actors for the warrior class, in a sense, a prayer for peace, longevity and the prosperity of the social elite.

Noh Theatre as an art form has been awarded UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage status.





 

Ichikawa Ebizo XI (born December 6, 1977) is the eleventh and current holder of the Ebizo name. He is a famous Kabuki, television and film actor and heir to the prestigious Ichikawa clan of kabuki actors whose family line stretches back to Danjuro I in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

The son of Danjuro XII, he was born in Tokyo and began his career at the age of six in a 1983 play of Genji Monogatari. In 1985 he was bestowed the name Shinnosuke VII and continued to perform in kabuki under this name until 2003. He made his first television appearance in 1994 in the NHK Taiga drama, Hanna no Ran, which starred his father.

He has appeared in several commercials, and in his first film role, Deguchi no Nai Umi, (Sea With No Exit) in 2006. He toured Europe, Australia and various other prefectures in Japan doing kabuki. In 2007 he was awarded the L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres after a performance at the Palais Garnier in Paris. A total of twelve performances of Yoshitsune Senbon Zakura by the Shochiku Grand Kabuki featuring Ebizo were held at Sadler's Wells Theatre in London from June 4 to 15, 2010.





 

Noh





Kabuki





Musicians